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Submission on the New South Wales vocational education and training review

The Clean Energy Council and the Australian Hydrogen Council welcome the opportunity to make a joint submission in response to the NSW VET Review Discussion Paper

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Submission

16 Nov

NSW Peak Demand Reduction Scheme: Rule Change 2

The Clean Energy Council and its members are strongly supportive of the NSW Government’s focus on demand response and demand shifting mechanisms to reduce demand during peak periods. The greatest opportunities to enhance the energy transition reside in the demand-side of the market, and the CEC and its Members commend the important work the NSW Office of Energy and Climate Change are doing. By improving our energy performance (including demand response, load shifting and energy efficiency), we can make the energy transition faster, cheaper, smoother and more reliable.

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Submission

16 Nov

Briefing note to Energy and Climate Change Ministerial Council, November 2023

This document includes the Clean Energy Council's recommendations for discussions to take place at the November meeting of the Energy and Climate Change Ministerial Council

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Submission

15 Nov

Submission in response to the Renewable Electricity Guarantee of Origin Approach Paper

The Clean Energy Council (CEC) welcomes the opportunity to respond to the Australian Government’s Approach Paper on renewable electricity certification as part of the Guarantee of Origin Framework for Australia.

Decarbonisation commitments are gathering pace globally, and there is increasing demand for green and low-emissions products. The proposed Guarantee of Origin framework represents a landmark policy proposal, which will provide Australia with an essential mechanism to be able to demonstrate the environmental credentials of the products we produce, for both domestic and international consumption. This submission focuses on the design and implementation of a proposed Renewable Electricity Guarantee of Origin (REGO), which would be a subset of the overall guarantee of origin architecture.

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Submission

27 Oct

Clean Energy Council - Security frameworks review

The Clean Energy Council (CEC) is the peak body for the clean energy industry in Australia, representing over 1,000 of the leading businesses operating in renewable energy, energy storage, and renewable hydrogen. The CEC is committed to accelerating the decarbonisation of Australia’s energy system as rapidly as possible while maintaining a secure and reliable supply of electricity for customers.

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Submission

12 Oct

Submission to Investment Certainty Rule Change

This rule change comes at a critical point in the NEM transition. The rapid and unplanned exit of thermal coal generation, combined with a national target to achieve 82% renewables by 2030, means it is critical that we accelerate new investment in renewable generation and storage.

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Submission

5 Oct

Submission on Vicgrid Options Assessment Method to Offshore Wind Transmission in Gippsland and Portland

Victoria’s transition to renewable energy requires the timely construction of new transmission lines to enable upcoming offshore wind farms to connect to the grid. Delays to transmission means delays to these projects, which keeps Victoria’s greenhouse gas emissions high, contributing to greater climate impacts.

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Submission

4 Oct

Submission on the Essential Services Commission’s Land Access Code of Practice draft determination

Victoria has set targets of reaching 65% renewable energy by 2030 and 95% by 2035. These targets are commendable and represent an essential element of the state’s response to the climate crisis. Because much of the state’s best wind and solar resources do not overlap with the previously dominant source of electricity (ie. Latrobe Valley brown coal generators), Victoria’s transition to renewable energy requires the timely construction of new transmission lines to enable wind and solar farms in other parts of the state to connect to the grid. Delays to transmission means delays to wind/solar projects, which keeps Victoria’s greenhouse gas emissions high, contributing to greater climate impacts.

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Submission

4 Oct